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Medical Cannabis Laws State-by-State

Medical Cannabis Laws State-by-State:

Possession Limits

Process for Becoming a Medical Cannabis Patient

Qualifying Conditions for Becoming a Medical Cannabis Patient


Medical cannabis is being legalized, slowly but surely, state by state, across the U.S. More than 40 states and territories have passed laws acknowledging cannabis offers a wealth of medicinal value by legalizing it in some form. Through this transitional process, the specific rules and regulations for each state are constantly changing, progressing, getting better. It can be difficult to keep up with the laws as they shift towards more compassionate and reasonable policies - so, we have compiled, for your convenience, an outline of the current status of each state’s medical cannabis program.

Although there are many unique aspects to various states’ laws regarding the subject, there are certain things you will find are very much the same in each state currently implementing a medical cannabis program. First, in each state, in order to be eligible for legal access to medical cannabis, all persons are required to receive some form of authorization, certification, recommendation, or approval from a physician, acknowledging that the person in question falls within the respective state’s guidelines for being qualified to become a medical cannabis patient (a medical cannabis patient is someone given approval to participate in the state’s medical cannabis program). States each have their own set of medical conditions they deem acceptable as qualification for receiving medical cannabis patient status, and some states have restrictions on which physicians can certify a person as qualified to become a medical cannabis patient.

If interested in becoming a medical cannabis patient in your state, check your local ordinances. Laws can vary not just state to state, but also by county, and even in city and town jurisdictions. To get you started, however, here is a quick guide to help differentiate between the various states’ medical cannabis systems.

What you will find listed below is a comparison of each state’s possession limits, detailing how much cannabis (or cannabis-derived medicine) patients are permitted to have, as well as a basic overview of the process for becoming a medical cannabis patient in each state, and a list of the medical conditions each state recognizes as qualifying for medical cannabis patient status. While there may be additional details pertaining to each state’s laws and regulatory structure that require further research, hopefully this state by state breakdown will help you better understand the medical cannabis laws in your area.

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Notes:

*Alabama’s mmj law will go into effect June 1st.

*Washington’s laws will change July 1st (possession limits altered, etc.).

*Minnesota will add intractable pain to the list of qualifying conditions beginning August 1st.

*Connecticut’s Legislature has passed a bill (HB 5450) expanding access (adding minors, new conditions, etc.) which could be signed by the governor at any time.

*Oklahoma’s Legislature has passed a bill (Hb 2835) to expand access to medical cannabis (adding new qualifying conditions, etc.) which could be signed by the governor at any time.

*Louisiana is poised to pass new legislation that will alter their current non-operational mmj status (law may become operational, qualifying conditions may change, etc.).

*Ohio’s Legislature is currently considering a bill to legalize medical cannabis (HB 523).


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  • Alabama

    It is legal for patients to possess and use cannabis oil that has no more than 3% THC.

    Personal physicians can issue medical cannabis recommendations.

    Qualifying conditions include: medical conditions that cause seizures, or are otherwise untreatable.


     

  • Alaska

    Alaska has legalized cannabis for both medical and recreational use. Possessing up to 1 ounce of usable cannabis, and cultivating up to 6 plants (up to 3 may be mature), is legal for registered medical patients, and for recreational users who are 21 and older.

    The state requires those looking to become a medical cannabis patient to apply through the State Department of Health and Social Services. The form to apply can be found here: http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/VitalStats/Pages/marijuana.aspx

    Qualifying conditions include: cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, cachexia, severe pain, severe nausea, seizures, or persistent muscle spasms.

     


 

  • Arizona

    Patients may possess up to 2.5 ounces of usable cannabis, and may cultivate up to 12 plants if they live at least 25 miles from a registered dispensary.

    Those wanting to become medical cannabis patients must apply through the state’s Department of Health Services. More information about applying can be found here: http://azdhs.gov/licensing/medical-marijuana/index.php

    Qualifying conditions include: Alzheimer's Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease), cachexia or wasting syndrome, cancer, chronic pain, Crohn's disease, glaucoma, Hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, nausea, persistent muscle spasms, PTSD, and seizures.



 

  • Arkansas

    There is no medical cannabis program currently in effect.


 


 

  • California

    Possession and cultivation limits can vary based on different jurisdictions, and doctor recommendations, but patients are allowed at least 6 mature or 12 immature plants, and 8 ounces of processed cannabis. Doctors can authorize a patient to have any amount they deem necessary to fulfill a patient’s needs.

    Any physician can issue a medical cannabis recommendation; the state also offers optional I.D. cards with a registry for patients who want additional verification. More information about applying for a card can be found here: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MMP/Pages/default.aspx

    Qualifying conditions include: cancer, anorexia, AIDS, chronic pain, spasticity, glaucoma, arthritis, migraine, or any other illness for which cannabis provides relief.


     

  • Colorado

    Cannabis is legalized both for medical and recreational use; those 21 and older can legally possess 1 ounce of cannabis (including edibles and concentrates), and patients can possess up to 2 ounces. Both patients and recreational users can cultivate up to 6 plants (up to 3 may be mature).

    Prospective patients are required to apply through the state’s Department of Public Health and Environment. More information about applying can be found here: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/medicalmarijuana

    Qualifying conditions include: cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, cachexia, persistent muscle spasms, seizures, severe nausea, and severe pain.


     

  • Connecticut

    Registered patients may possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis per month, unless otherwise given authorization from a physician to have more. Patients are required to be 18 years or older.

    Qualifying conditions include: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord damage causing intractable spasticity, epilepsy, cachexia, wasting syndrome, Crohn's disease, PTSD, sickle cell disease, ulcerative colitis, post laminectomy syndrome (“failed back syndrome”), severe psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and post-surgical back pain with a condition called chronic radiculopathy

    Those seeking to become a patient are required to apply through the state’s Department of Consumer Protection. More information on how to apply can be found here: http://www.ct.gov/dcp/cwp/view.asp?a=4287&q=503670&dcpNav=|&dcpNav_GID=2109


     

  • Delaware

    Registered patients are allowed to possess six ounces of cannabis at once, and to obtain up to three ounces of processed cannabis every 14 days. Patients under 18 are allowed to possess oil that contains at least 15% CBD (cannabidiol) or THC-A (tetrahydrocannabinol acid), and no more than 7% THC.

    Prospective patients need to apply through the state’s Department of Health and Social Services. More information on how to apply can be found here: http://dhss.delaware.gov/dph/hsp/medmarhome.html

    Qualifying conditions include: cancer, cachexia, HIV/AIDS, decompensated cirrhosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, agitation related to Alzheimer’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, severe debilitating pain that has not responded to other treatments for more than three months or for which other treatments  produced serious side effects, intractable nausea, seizures, severe and persistent muscle spasms, and autism with aggressive or self-injurious behavior.


     

  • Florida

    Patients with cancer, seizure disorders, or muscle spasms are allowed to possess cannabis strains with at least 10% CBD and no more than 0.8% THC. Patients with terminal illnesses are permitted to possess additional strains without CBD/THC restrictions.

    Physicians can authorize the use of cannabis for qualifying patients. More information on how to become a patient can be found here: http://www.floridahealth.gov/programs-and-services/office-of-compassionate-use/index.html

    Qualifying conditions include: cancer, seizure disorders, severe and persistent muscle spasms, or terminal illness (patients diagnosed with no more than 12-months to live).


     

  • Georgia

    Registered patients are permitted to have 20 ounces of infused cannabis oils containing not more than 5% THC and an amount of CBD equal to or greater than the amount of THC.

    Those seeking to become a patient must apply through the state’s Department of Health. More information on how to apply can be found here: http://dph.georgia.gov/low-thc-oil-registry

    Qualifying conditions include: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, cancer, Crohn’s disease, mitochondrial disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, seizure disorder, and sickle cell disease.
     


 

  • Hawaii

    Registered patients may possess up to 4 ounces of usable cannabis, and cultivate up to 7 plants.

    Those seeking to become patients must receive certification from their physician that they can benefit from medical cannabis, and register with the state’s Department of Health. More information on how to register can be found here: http://health.hawaii.gov/medicalmarijuana/

    Qualifying conditions include: cachexia, cancer, chronic pain, Crohn's disease, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, nausea, persistent muscle spasms, PTSD, seizures.

     


 

  • Idaho

    There is no medical cannabis program currently in effect.


     

  • Illinois

    Registered patients may possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis, unless given a waiver by their doctor to have more.

    Patients who receive authorization from their physician to use medical cannabis are required to register with the state’s Department of Public health. More information on how to register can be found here: http://www.illinois.gov/gov/mcpp/Pages/default.aspx

    Qualifying conditions include: HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Crohn's disease, agitation of Alzheimer’s disease, cachexia/wasting syndrome, muscular dystrophy, severe fibromyalgia, spinal cord disease, Tarlov cysts, hydromyelia, syringomyelia, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury and post-concussion syndrome, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Arnold Chiari malformation, Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA); Parkinson’s disease, Tourette’s syndrome, Myoclonus, Dystonia, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD), Causalgia, CRPS, Neurofibromatosis, Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy, Sjogren’s syndrome, Lupus, Interstitial Cystitis, Myasthenia Gravis, Hydrocephalus, nail patella syndrome, residual limb pain, and seizures.

     

  • Indiana

    There is no medical cannabis program currently in effect.

     

  • Iowa

    Registered patients are permitted to possess up to 32 ounces of CBD oil.

    Those wanting to become patients must receive a recommendation from a neurologist, and register with the state's Department of Public Health.

    Qualifying conditions include: intractable epilepsy.

     

  • Kansas

    There is no medical cannabis program currently in effect.

     

  • Kentucky

    Patients are permitted to have CBD extracts.

    The state requires prospective patients to receive a recommendation from a physician practicing at a hospital or associated clinic affiliated with a Kentucky public university having a college or school of medicine, or be enrolled in a clinical trial.

    Qualifying conditions include: intractable epilepsy.

     

  • Louisiana

    The implied limits for patients in the state is a 30-day supply of non-smokable cannabis medicine (medicating through inhalation is prohibited).

    Prospective patients are required to get a prescription from a physician to use medical cannabis; however, prescribing medical cannabis remains explicitly illegal under federal law, so currently nobody has been authorized to participate in the medical cannabis program in the state.

    Qualifying conditions: glaucoma, cancer and spastic quadriplegia.

     

  • Maine

    Patients are permitted to possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis and cultivate up to 6 plants.

    Any active, licensed physician can provide certification for use of medical cannabis to patients. The state offers optional certification I.D. cards, issued by the state’s Department of Health and Human Services, for patients who want them. More information on certification can be found here: http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/dlrs/mmm/index.shtml

    Qualifying conditions include: cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's Disease), Alzheimer's disease, nail-patella syndrome, chronic pain, cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe nausea, seizures, including those characteristic of epilepsy, severe and persistent muscle spasms, multiple sclerosis, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), inflammatory bowel disease, dyskinetic and spastic movement disorders and other diseases causing severe and persistent muscle spasms, Huntington’s disease, and Parkinson's disease.


 

  • Maryland

    Registered patients are permitted to have up to 120 grams of dried cannabis, unless given authorization from a physician to have more.

    Those wanting to become a patient must register with the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commision, and obtain written certification from a physician. Dentists, podiatrists, midwives, and nurse practitioners will be authorized to provide patient certifications as of June 1st, 2017. More information about registration can be found here: http://mmcc.maryland.gov/default.aspx

    Qualifying conditions include: severe loss of appetite, wasting, severe or chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures or persistent muscle spasms, glaucoma, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), or any condition that is severe, for which other medical treatments have been ineffective, if the symptoms can reasonably be expected to be relieved by the medical use of cannabis.

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  • Massachusetts

    Registered patients are allowed to possess a 60-day supply of cannabis, which is deemed to be 10 ounces, unless a physician specifies a need for more. Home cultivation is permitted only with special authorization accommodating for financial hardship, or living too far from a dispensary.

    Prospective patients are required to receive written certification from a physician, and register through the state’s Medical Use of Marijuana Program. More information on registration can be found here: http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/departments/dph/programs/hcq/medical-marijuana/

    Qualifying conditions include: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), cancer, Crohn's disease, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, or any other conditions as determined in writing by a patient's physician.


 

  • Michigan

    Registered patients are permitted to possess up to 2.5 ounces of processed cannabis, and cultivate up to 12 plants.

    Those wanting to become a patient must receive a recommendation from a physician, and register with the Michigan Medical Marihuana Program. More information on how to register can be found here: http://www.michigan.gov/lara/0,4601,7-154-72600_72603_51869---,00.html

    Qualifying conditions include: cancer, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Crohn's diseases, nail patella, glaucoma, agitation related to Alzheimer’s disease, PTSD, severe and chronic pain, cachexia or wasting, severe nausea, seizures, or severe and persistent muscle spasms.

     

  • Minnesota

    Patients are permitted to possess a 30-day supply, which is to be determined by pharmacists at cannabis patient centers.

    Becoming a patient requires obtaining written certification from a licensed health care practitioner, and registering with the state’s Department of Health. More information about registering can be found here: http://www.health.state.mn.us/topics/cannabis/

    Qualifying conditions include: cancer, nausea or severe vomiting, cachexia or severe wasting, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Tourette syndrome, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), seizures, epilepsy, severe and persistent muscle spasms, Multiple Sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, or terminal illness with a probable life expectancy of less than one year.

     

  • Mississippi

    Patients are permitted to possess cannabis extracts that contain more than 15 percent cannabidiol and no more than 0.5 percent THC, and are either obtained from or tested by the National Center for Natural Products Research at the University of Mississippi, and dispensed by the Department of Pharmacy Services at the University of Mississippi Medical Center (currently the University of Mississippi does not distribute cannabis for medicinal use).

    Any physician licensed in the state can authorize a qualifying patient to use medical cannabis.

    Qualifying conditions include: seizure disorders / intractable epilepsy .

     

  • Missouri

    Authorized patients are permitted to possess up to 20 ounces of extracts that contain at least 5% CBD and no more than 0.3% THC, unless granted a waiver to possess more.

    Prospective patients are required to obtain a written recommendation from a neurologist, and register with the state’s Department of Health and Senior Services. More information about registration can be found here: http://health.mo.gov/about/proposedrules/hempextract.php

    Qualifying conditions include: intractable epilepsy.

     

  • Montana

    Patients are allowed to possess up to 1 ounce, and cultivate up to 4 mature plants, and 12 immature plants.

    Those wanting to become a patient must obtain a recommendation from a physician, and register through the state’s Department of Health and Human Services. More information on how to register can be found here: http://dphhs.mt.gov/marijuana.aspx

    Qualifying conditions include: cachexia or wasting syndrome, cancer, chronic pain, Crohn's disease, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, nausea, seizures, and severe or persistent muscle spasms.

     

  • Nebraska

    There is no medical cannabis program currently in effect.

     

  • Nevada

    Registered patients are permitted to possess 2.5 ounces of cannabis, and patients are allowed to cultivate up to 12 mature plants if they live more than 25 miles from a dispensary, are incapable of traveling to a dispensary, or if the dispensaries in their county are unable to provide the quantity or strain of cannabis they require.

    Becoming a patient requires obtaining a recommendation from a physician, and registering through the state’s Department of Public and Behavioral Health. More information on how to register can be found here: http://dpbh.nv.gov/Reg/Medical_Marijuana/

    Qualifying conditions include: cancer, HIV/AIDS, glaucoma, PTSD, severe pain, cachexia, severe nausea, seizures, and persistent muscle spasms.

     

  • New Hampshire

    Registered patients are permitted to have 2 ounces of cannabis.

    Prospective patients must obtain written certification from a physician with whom they have had an on-going patient-provider relationship for at least three months, and register with the state’s Department of Health and Human Services. More information on registering can be found here: http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/oos/tcp/index.htm

    Qualifying conditions include: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease, cachexia, cancer, chemotherapy induced anorexia, chronic pancreatitis, Crohn's disease, elevated intraocular pressure, epilepsy, glaucoma, hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, lupus, moderate to severe vomiting, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, nausea, Parkinson's disease, persistent muscle spasms, seizures, severe pain (that has not responded to previously prescribed medication), spinal cord injury or disease, traumatic brain injury, and wasting syndrome.

     

  • New Jersey

    Registered patients are permitted to obtain up to 2 ounces of cannabis per month.

    Those wanting to become a patient must obtain certification from a physician registered with the state’s Medicinal Marijuana Program, and register with the Medicinal Marijuana Program as well. More information on registering can be found here: http://www.nj.gov/health/medicalmarijuana/index.shtml

    Qualifying conditions include: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, inflammatory bowel disease, terminal illness, conditions resistant to conventional treatments, seizure disorders, intractable skeletal muscular spasticity, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, cancer, severe pain, severe nausea, vomiting, and cachexia.


 

  • New Mexico

    Registered patients are allowed to have 6 ounces of cannabis (or more if authorized by their physician), and patients who receive a permit are allowed to cultivate up to 16 plants (4 mature, 12 immature).

    Prospective patients must receive a recommendation from their physician (in some cases patients are required to receive additional recommendations, and provide additional medical records / evidence of qualifying conditions), and apply through the state’s Department of Health. More information about applying can be found here: https://nmhealth.org/about/mcp/svcs/

    Qualifying conditions include: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease), anorexia/cachexia, arthritis, cancer, cervical dystonia, chronic pain, Crohn's disease, epilepsy, glaucoma, hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, being a hospice patient, Huntington's disease, intractable nausea/vomiting, multiple sclerosis, painful peripheral neuropathy, Parkinson's disease, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and spinal cord damage.

     

  • New York

    Registered patients are permitted to possess a 30-day supply of cannabis (the specific amount is to be determined by patient’s physician).

    Those wanting to become a patient must receive certification by a physician registered with the New York State Department of Health's Medical Marijuana Program, and must register with the program as well. More information on how to register can be found here: https://www.health.ny.gov/regulations/medical_marijuana/regulations.htm

    Qualifying conditions include: cancer, HIV/AIDS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury with spasticity, epilepsy, inflammatory bowel disease, neuropathy, Huntington's disease, cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe or chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, and severe or persistent muscle spasms.

     

  • North Carolina

    Patients are permitted to possess cannabis with at least 5% CBD and no more than .9% THC.

    Those wanting to become a patient must receive a recommendation from a neurologist.

    Qualifying conditions include: intractable epilepsy.

     

  • North Dakota

    There is no medical cannabis program currently in effect.


 

  • Ohio

    There is no medical cannabis program currently in effect.

     

  • Oklahoma

    Authorized patients under the age of 18 are permitted to have high-CBD cannabis oil with less than .3% THC.

    Patients must be enrolled in an authorized clinical research program in order to receive legal protections and access to CBD medicine.

    Qualifying conditions include: Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome, Dravet Syndrome, or other severe epilepsy that is not adequately treated by traditional medical therapies.

     

  • Oregon

    Recreational cannabis is legal for those 21 and older. Recreational users can possess up to eight ounces of useable cannabis and cultivate 4 plants per residence in Oregon. Individuals are permitted to carry up to 1 ounce in public. Patients are permitted to have 24 ounces of usable cannabis, and to cultivate 6 mature cannabis plants, and 18 immature seedlings.

    Prospective patients are required to receive authorization from a physician. Patients who register with the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program receive full arrest protection when operating within the law; patients who do not register with the state will retain an affirmative defense if faced with prosecution while operating within the law. More information about registration can be found here: http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/ChronicDisease/medicalmarijuanaprogram/Pages/index.aspx

    Qualifying conditions include: cancer, glaucoma, degenerative or pervasive neurological conditions, HIV/AIDS, Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), cachexia, severe pain, severe nausea, seizures, including but not limited to seizures caused by epilepsy, and persistent muscle spasms, including but not limited to spasms caused by multiple sclerosis.

     

  • Pennsylvania

    Registered patients are permitted to possess a 30-day supply of cannabis pills, oils, gels, creams, ointments, tinctures, liquids, and non-whole plant forms (whole flower and leaves are prohibited, and smoking is prohibited).

    Those wanting to become a patient must obtain certification from a physician, and register with the state’s Department of Health. More information on registering can be found here: https://www.governor.pa.gov/topic/medical-marijuana/

    Qualifying conditions include: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, autism, cancer, Crohn’s disease, damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord with objective neurological indication of intractable spasticity, epilepsy, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Huntington’s disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, intractable seizures, multiple sclerosis, neuropathies, Parkinson’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), severe chronic or intractable pain of neuropathic origin, severe chronic or intractable pain in which conventional therapeutic intervention and opiate therapy is contraindicated or ineffective, and sickle cell anemia.


 

  • Rhode Island

    Registered patients are permitted to possess 2.5 ounces of cannabis, and to cultivate up to 12 mature plants and 12 seedlings.

    Prospective patients are required to obtain a recommendation from a physician, and register with the state’s Department of Health. More information on how to register can be found here: http://health.ri.gov/licenses/detail.php?id=280

    Qualifying conditions include: cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe, debilitating, chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, including but not limited to those characteristic of epilepsy, severe and persistent muscle spasms, including but not limited to those characteristic of multiple sclerosis or Crohn's disease, and agitation related to Alzheimer's disease.

 


 

  • South Carolina

    Authorized patients are permitted to possess cannabis extracts that contain more than 15% CBD and no more than 0.9% THC.

    Prospective patients must receive a recommendation from a physician licensed to practice medicine by the South Carolina Board of Medical Examiners, who practices in an academic medical center in the state, treats patients with severe forms of epilepsy, and is serving as either lead or sublead investigator working on a clinical research study to treat severe forms of epilepsy. Patients must be enrolled in an authorized clinical research program in order to receive legal protections and access to cannabis medicine.

    Qualifying conditions include: Dravet syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and refractory epilepsy.



 

  • South Dakota

    There is no medical cannabis program currently in effect.


     

  • Tennessee

    Authorized patients are permitted to possess cannabis oil containing no more than 0.9% THC.

    Any physician working on a clinical research study investigating treatment options on uncontrollable seizures may recommend cannabis oil. Patients must enroll in a clinical research study run by a hospital or clinic affiliated with a school of medicine in the state to receive legal protections or access to cannabis medicine.

    Qualifying conditions include: intractable seizures.



 

  • Texas

    Patients are permitted to possess cannabis oil preparations with no more than 0.5% THC and no less than 10% CBD.

    Prospective patients are required to get a prescription from a physician to use medical cannabis; however, prescribing medical cannabis remains explicitly illegal under federal law, so currently nobody has been authorized to participate in the medical cannabis program in the state.

    Qualifying conditions include: intractable epilepsy.


     

  • Utah

    Patients are permitted to possess cannabis extracts that contain at least 15% CBD and no more than 0.3% THC.

    Those wanting to become a patient must receive a recommendation from a neurologist, and apply with the state’s Department of Health. More information about applying can be found here: http://health.utah.gov/hempregistry/index.html

    Qualifying conditions include: intractable epilepsy.


     

  • Vermont

    Patients are permitted to possess 2 ounces of cannabis, and cultivate 9 plants (2 mature, 7 immature).

    Prospective patients are required to obtain a recommendation from a physician licensed to practice medicine and able to prescribe drugs in Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts or New York, and to register with the Vermont Marijuana Registry. More information on how to register can be found here: http://vcic.vermont.gov/marijuana-registry

    Qualifying conditions include: cachexia or wasting syndrome, cancer, HIV/AIDS, multiple sclerosis, seizures, severe pain, and severe nausea.


     

  • Virginia

    Patients are permitted to possess cannabis extracts that contain at least 15% CBD or THC-A, but no more than 5% THC.

    Those wanting to become a patient must obtain written certification from a physician.

    Qualifying conditions include: intractable epilepsy.


     

  • Washington

    Cannabis is legal for recreational use for those 21 and older. Recreational users can possess 1 ounce of usable cannabis, 16 ounces of cannabis-infused product in solid form, 72 ounces of cannabis-infused product in liquid form, or 7 grams of cannabis concentrate. Patients are permitted to purchase up to 3 ounces of usable cannabis, 48 ounces of cannabis-infused product in solid form, 216 ounces of cannabis-infused product in liquid form, or 21 grams of cannabis concentrate, and are permitted possess at least 6 ounces but as much as 16 ounces, and to cultivate at least 4 but as many as 15 plants.

    Those wanting to become a patient must receive a recommendation from a physician, physician assistant, osteopathic physicians, osteopathic physician assistants, naturopathic physician, or advanced registered nurse practitioner. More information on becoming a patient can be found here: http://www.doh.wa.gov/YouandYourFamily/Marijuana/MedicalMarijuana

    Qualifying conditions include: cachexia, cancer, chronic renal failure, Crohn's disease, glaucoma, hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, intractable pain, persistent muscle spasms and/or spasticity, nausea, post-traumatic stress disorder, seizures, traumatic brain injury, or any terminal or debilitating condition.


 


 

  • West Virginia

    There is no medical cannabis program currently in effect.


     

  • Wisconsin

    Patients are permitted to possess CBD in a form without a psychoactive effect.

    Prospective patients are required to receive a written recommendation from a physician.

    Qualifying conditions include: seizure disorders.


     

  • Wyoming

    Registered patients are permitted to possess cannabis extracts containing at least 15% CBD and no more than 0.3% THC.

    Those wanting to become a patient must obtain authorization from a neurologist, and register with the state’s Department of Health. More information on how to register can be found here: http://www.health.wyo.gov/publichealth/hempregistry.html

    Qualifying conditions include: intractable epilepsy or seizure disorders.


     

  • Washington, D.C.

    Cannabis has been legalized for recreational use for those 21 and older. Recreational users and patients are permitted to possess up to 2 ounces of cannabis, and cultivate up to 6 plants (3 mature, 3 immature).

    Those wanting to become a patient must obtain a recommendation from a physician who is licensed to practice medicine in the District of Columbia, and register with the Department of Health. More information on how to register can be found here: http://doh.dc.gov/service/medical-marijuana-program

    Qualifying conditions include: any condition for which treatment with medical cannabis is be deemed beneficial by the patient’s physician.



 

  • American Samoa

    There is no medical cannabis program currently in effect.



 

  • Guam

    Guam legalized medical cannabis in 2014, but regulations to implement the program are still being drafted. More information on current draft rules can be found here: http://dphss.guam.gov/article/2015/07/15/draft-guam-rules-governing-medical-marijuana



 

  • Northern Mariana Islands

    There is no medical cannabis program currently in effect.


     

  • Puerto Rico

    Puerto Rico legalized medical cannabis in 2015, but the program is not yet operational (it is expected to be operating by the end of 2016).



 

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